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Advice for Beginner

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Advice for Beginner

Postby kaos » December 30th, 2011, 3:49 pm

I have to apologize. . .I am a moderator here and having full control at my fingertips, I very ACCIDENTLY erased out parts of your message in the process of inserting some answers. HOWEVER, below are some answers to your questions. Please repost if I missed something. And again, I do apologize. Please forgive me.

>>> SHe has a .3 HP compressor fro her airbrush and wants to know if it is good enough to run an air eraser off of.
Do you think the air eraser would run off this compressor ?
Hook it up, try it and find out!! :mrgreen:

>>>She wants to do small items and pet memorials and has a big compressor coming soon, along with a blast cabinet and this will open up more possibilities so she asks about films types:
..... what kind of film and thickness would be appropriate for these works?

Depends on your grit size and the depth to which you want to blast. Jump in and get your feet wet and a lot of answers will come just by "doing". They have photoresist films that are as thick as 10 mls and used on blasting monuments..
.
Probably get yourself a # 180 SiC grit and try anything but the thinnest photoresist. Everybody has his or her own favorite and reason for why they like to use it and for what. That's probably why you see so many different resist films out there. If you are going for stone, then the Rapid MAsk is probably not a good choice, so get one of the washout type films.

~Inga
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby Kelly Harris » December 30th, 2011, 4:56 pm

I'll try and answer what I can here.

As far as a cabinet goes, do you a have Princess Auto nearby? They have a cabinet that usually goes on sale a couple of times a year. It's kind of small but will get you by on smaller items until you can get yourself something bigger. Don't get a benchtop model, you'll have no space to do anything, I made that mistake already. When I first started I didn't have the funds for a large cabinet so my husband and I built one out of plywood, it worked great!

You can purchase Ikonics products through Creative Art Glass and Rayzist products through Prestige Glass. I believe they are both in Ontario but it should save some time in shipping if they've got what you need in stock. I think they both have a starter kit that you can purchase with the exposure unit, washout system and film to get you started.

Does anyone know if you can use 3 or 5 mil washout on stone? I've never tried it so I'm not sure. I purchased some 10 mil washout when I first started with stone but quickly realized that at $15.00 a sheet I was much better off with a vinyl cutter. The only time I ever use washout now is for anything smaller or very detailed.

Hope that helps you out some.

Kelly
PS CS2, CD X4, Acer laptop, Canon 700F scanner, HP laserjet 1600 printer, Epson Stylus 1400 printer, Intuos 4 tablet, Letralite, Summa D610 plotter, 2 cabinets, 2 pressure pots, 60 gallon air compressor, Fuji S8100 DSLR.

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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby Inga » December 31st, 2011, 2:32 am

Well, Kelly, they do halftones on stone, so that would be with the 3-5 mil washout. Unfortunately, I have only read about it. Maybe Charles has something to add. . .

Kelly is right about using vinyl masks...much cheaper....but you pay for it in buying the vinyl cutter (which you will eventually end up getting anyway, I'm pretty sure) Nothing wrong with doing washout. . . and you don't need to be a whiz at vectors with much of it, so its easier in that way. You could always try the 10 mil. I hear its real sweet.

~Inga
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSJv5ta9hwU
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby kaos » January 1st, 2012, 5:34 pm

Thank you so much for your replies. I had forgot to ask about Canadian suppliers, so will definitely look into them. Thanks. Yes we do have a Princess Auto just an hour away, new store, and I did look at their cabinets, was debating about a bench model or larger one. My husband said I wouldn't be happy with the size of a bench one, should get a floor model .We have missed out on a couple good used ones on craigslist. We are certainly on the hunt for one though, may end up with the one from Princess . I appreciate your help and encouragement. Will be back with more questions, I'm sure.
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby Kelly Harris » January 1st, 2012, 6:24 pm

I don't use Craigslist as it doesn't seem very popular, at least in Edmonton. I'm a big Kijiji fan, that's actually where I found my smaller Princess Auto cabinet.
PS CS2, CD X4, Acer laptop, Canon 700F scanner, HP laserjet 1600 printer, Epson Stylus 1400 printer, Intuos 4 tablet, Letralite, Summa D610 plotter, 2 cabinets, 2 pressure pots, 60 gallon air compressor, Fuji S8100 DSLR.

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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby jimg » June 9th, 2012, 12:11 pm

Hi All,

I am very new to sandcarving and have tried several different substartes. I'm
not having any trouble with glass,mirrors,or even stone. My problem is wood. I
have been using 5mil photoresist and find the film is not sticking, and not
holding up during the sandblasting. Does anyone have some tips for me?

Thanks
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby Inga » June 9th, 2012, 12:58 pm

Only high tack vinyl and rubber stencils are designed to stick to BARE wood.
The key word here is BARE. Therefore, you can paint or seal your wood with varnish, then apply your stencil and blast.
the results usually turn out very nice, in my opinion.

I think there are also some options using laser, but I don't know much about laser, so will not pretend to, and let somebody else jump in on that.

~Inga
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby jimg » June 9th, 2012, 1:37 pm

Thanks for the help, I am using 5mil photo resist. Are there any tricks to prevent "blowout" or the stencil being damaged during the sandblasting stage?

Thanks again
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby Inga » June 9th, 2012, 10:36 pm

I don't think the stencil you mention is suitable for blasting in wood. Possibly for fine real work though. . . .. Anybody else?
-------------------------------
For glass, the ways to help avoid blowout is to reduce pressure, use finer grit, and back further away from the work. Also make sure you are blasting perpendicular to your surface so you are not blowing air and grit from an angle which can help lift an edge.

~inga.
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Re: Advice for Beginner

Postby jimg » September 1st, 2012, 10:24 am

I have been using a complete system bought from SCM. A couple days ago the air stopped feeding to my nozzle. I thought two things, either my nozzle needed replace (worn) or my foot pedal needs replaced. I have since replaced both and NO luck. I have the Humphrey foot pedal with 3 connections - 1 CYL and 2 ON.. I have the CYL connected before my pressure gauge on the pot and the ON connected to the T at the bottom...
Any suggestions? would be a great help!


Thanks

Jim
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