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A Bottle . . .

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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Ginger » September 29th, 2010, 1:54 pm

I used spray paints in rattle cans that I got from Hobby Lobby. I don't have an airbrush yet, and have seen our other members posting about using Krylon and Rustoleum, so I figured these would be fine. Also, I didn't want to invest in an airbrush until after I had tested my two-stencil method, because I knew I sure wasn't going to be doing any more bottles if I had to paint them by hand!!!

Anyway, I applied Stencil 1, then peeled off the middle rectangle and spray painted it with the pink paint. While the paint was still wet, I removed the adjacent areas of masking -- the ones that I would next paint with dark red, for the text. When the pink paint was dry, I lightly masked the pink that I didn't want to paint over, then I spray painted the dark red, then removed the adjacent masking (for the area that would become the light red stripe).
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My studio includes: Denver glass kiln, Skutt ceramics kiln, Jen-Ken kiln, compressor, sandblast setup, lap grinder, two ring saws, hand-held water-fed grinder, plotter, UV exposure unit. I work in glass, concrete, clay, metal, and stone.
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Ginger » September 29th, 2010, 2:09 pm

When I was ready to paint the light red stripe, I lightly masked the previous colors so they wouldn't get ruined. Then I painted the light red, and while that paint was still wet, I removed all the masking that remained in the design area -- in other words, that light masking tape, plus the remains of Stencil 1, which at this point had served its purpose.

After the paint had cured thoroughly, I applied Stencil 2, using the peeled up corners of the stencil to ensure that the design was properly registered on the areas I had already painted. I weeded the parts that were to become background. So, in the third picture here, the white that you see is the vinyl, covering up the three colors of paint already applied -- the paint that I want to retain; and the colored areas are overspray that is soon going to be removed when I blast out the background.
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My studio includes: Denver glass kiln, Skutt ceramics kiln, Jen-Ken kiln, compressor, sandblast setup, lap grinder, two ring saws, hand-held water-fed grinder, plotter, UV exposure unit. I work in glass, concrete, clay, metal, and stone.
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Ginger » September 29th, 2010, 2:33 pm

I blasted out the background as deep as I dared! I probably could have gone deeper, but I was chicken. Then I spray painted the entire background with the same white paint that I had used earlier as a base coat for the first three colors. I removed all the adjacent masking and allowed the paint to dry overnight. The next day I taped around the design and applied the clear coat, and removed ALL the remaining masking while the clear coat was still wet. The next day I cleaned the glass thoroughly, then I dipped the top in NoChip Dip dipping "wax." It took me four tries! If I haven't yet whined about that process, allow me to do so in my next post, and if I"m repeating myself, please just indulge me!
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My studio includes: Denver glass kiln, Skutt ceramics kiln, Jen-Ken kiln, compressor, sandblast setup, lap grinder, two ring saws, hand-held water-fed grinder, plotter, UV exposure unit. I work in glass, concrete, clay, metal, and stone.
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Coppers Lot » September 30th, 2010, 12:44 am

Thanks for that Ginger, very very interesting.
40lb pressure pot with inga mods, compressor,leaky cabinet thingy with syphon,letralite with red thingy,graphtec 3000-60 BRAND NEW = 1/8" PAB Gun and tips. Special Pressure Poy for Xmas.
http://www.worldofglasscraft.com
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Sammy » September 30th, 2010, 6:54 am

Ginger,
What a beautiful job :)
I have a feeling you're / were a teacher with all the detailed explaining/planning you did.
keep this up and soon you will be the master of bottle etching.
I have not ventured into the bottle etching yet but I'm trying to find some time for that.
Thank you for posting and sharing.
Sammy
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Charles » September 30th, 2010, 6:56 am

Very nice Ginger
Charles Mckenzie
McKenzie Monuments Inc.
3450 N. St. Louis St.
Batesville, AR 72501
870-793-3216
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Ginger » September 30th, 2010, 7:40 am

Thanks again for the kind words. Sammy, I've never been a teacher by profession, but I do love to teach and share what I've learned with others. I got a lot of practice with that when my kids were growing up! And I'm very patient . . . Also, I believe the best way to grow our profession -- or any profession -- is through an open exchange of ideas. I will admit, I am sometime tempted to hoard information -- an all too human frailty, I'm afraid -- but it's the wrong way. Nobody owns a technique, and the more we all share, the more we'll all know, and the bigger our industry will grow, and the more opportunity there will be for all. At least, that's how I see it, and how I prefer to operate.

This two-stencil method that I decided to try is, I believe, very much akin to the silkscreening process, so it's really nothing new. I have never done any silkscreening, but as I understand it you create a separate stencil for each color that you want to print onto your design, and you make sure that each stencil aligns perfectly with all the others. In my Stencil 1 I was able to put three different colors on one stencil simply because the design lent itself to that approach. The different color areas were large and distinct, and I could easily mask off the previous step with a bit of masking tape. If it had been a more complicated design, with tiny little dots of color, a separate stencil would have been required for each color, and I'm sure you could never use vinyl for that kind of design.

OK, onward! It's down to the dungeon for me today -- paperwork and filing, UGH!!!
My studio includes: Denver glass kiln, Skutt ceramics kiln, Jen-Ken kiln, compressor, sandblast setup, lap grinder, two ring saws, hand-held water-fed grinder, plotter, UV exposure unit. I work in glass, concrete, clay, metal, and stone.
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Ginger » September 30th, 2010, 7:59 am

Oh! I promised to whine about the dipping wax, and then forgot to do it! So here is my little pity party:

Time required to dip a bottle neck in wax when you have the proper setup: less than one minute.

Time required to dip a bottle neck in wax when you do it the Ginger Way: more than one hour! Here are the steps I followed:

    Be a cheapskate and buy one pound of each color of wax, instead of the 5 pounds of one or two colors that you should have bought.
    Buy one Fry Daddy that you plan to use for all colors of wax, instead of one Fry Daddy per color.
    Realize your Fry Daddy is still full of blue wax from your last experiment. Melt it out. Make a mess. Burn your finger. Search frantically for ice. Tend to your finger. Bandage it.
    Smarter now, clean the last of the blue wax with a paper towel on the end of a paint stir stick.
    Melt the black wax. Realize it is nowhere deep enough to dip the bottle.
    Find some noncombustible objects to prop the Fry Daddy at a precarious angle so there will be one area deep enough to dip the bottle.
    Give thanks that your insurance agent is not here to see this.
    Dip the bottle. Discover that it didn't come out right. Scrape off all the wax and throw it back in the pot. Find some more noncombustible objects. Add them to the previous assortment and prop the Fry Daddy up at an even steeper angle.
    Repeat the above two steps several more times.
    Finally get a successful dip! Go back to the house and drink some of the wine from an earlier, failed bottle attempt. Swear you will never attempt another bottle

Well . . . I guess I probably will make another bottle sometime -- not immediately, but someday! But before I try the dipping thing again, I will buy MORE of the particular color of wax that I want -- and frankly, black would take me a long way, since it goes with everything -- and if I do decide to use other colors, I will have a separate melting vessel for each. Learn from my mistakes, people!

OK. Off to the dungeon for real now.

Ginger
My studio includes: Denver glass kiln, Skutt ceramics kiln, Jen-Ken kiln, compressor, sandblast setup, lap grinder, two ring saws, hand-held water-fed grinder, plotter, UV exposure unit. I work in glass, concrete, clay, metal, and stone.
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby Sammy » September 30th, 2010, 9:08 am

Very humerous experience, the way you described it. I was laughing throughout the paragraph :lol:
would you share the supplier of the wax and the melting pot/container?
Thanks
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Re: A Bottle . . .

Postby gemsbym » September 30th, 2010, 9:57 am

Ginger you rock! Thanks so much for taking the time to explain the process. Great job. :toh:
Miriam :)
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