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Here I Is

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Re: Here I Is

Postby Sunny » August 23rd, 2018, 5:27 pm

Cool idea Terry. I'll buy an old windbreaker from GoodWillStores for a couple of bucks and problem solved. :B:
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Re: Here I Is

Postby JESS » August 24th, 2018, 6:12 pm

Wow! I guess I missed a bunch while off duty. Great thread!

Sunny, it's nice to see some new enthusiasm in you, glad you're on the high side! As I have always believed, our work is known as "Relief carving", but the term is usually used for 3D effect in non-transparent mediums, wood, metal, stone, etc., and are always viewed from the first surface. In the few gallery pieces I have put out in this style, they are referred to as "Inverse relief images".
It's worked for me for a long while. As far as the gloves, most will discover that they are great if you're sandblasting the rust off an old hot rod's wheel, where the inside of the cabinet is really violent and filthy. Our work is much less violent, to the point where gloves are not needed. As Terry pointed out, you probably will not sandblast your finger more than once! Years back, there were long threads discussing using knit cuffs (Too many to even think about), and I agree, though my cabinet still has gloves for students. As I recall, many have found, in order to keep the manicure acceptable, steal some of those rubber gloves from your Proctologist. Your dust collection should be strong enough to keep grit from getting past the cuffs, just remember to take off your watch.
For lighting, I have a small but clumsy 4" x 4" LED plate I made, with magnets on the back. Stick 'em where ya need em! (The wire is a PITA) You can get some great cheap LED flashlight type things at the 99 cent store, a few magnets, and good old tape, & make whatever suits you.
Glad you're back at it-
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Re: Here I Is

Postby Sunny » August 25th, 2018, 6:22 pm

Hey Jess, I really like the term inverse relief, that's a keeper, thanks. I have learned a lot in this thread about gloves, lighting, etc. It's nice to know that I can depend on folks here to help. I am looking forward to getting back to work. Anyway, thanks for the help. :ty:
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Re: Here I Is

Postby David Takes » August 25th, 2018, 8:11 pm

I like to keep my delicate hands out of the abrasive in case I ever get approached for a hand modeling contract. :grin: Seriously, I do prefer to keep my hands out of the grit. After 18 years, I replaced my gloves this year with some sweet lined gloves from Cyclone Blasters. I love the soft lining, especially on orders where I am blasting all day long.
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Re: Here I Is

Postby James Burke » August 26th, 2018, 8:21 am

As far as cabinet gloves go, I kept the sleeves only and cut off the gloves. They were way too thick and clumsy. I like to use a pair of thin, nitrile gloves. It greatly helps with dexterity, but most of all it keeps my hands from drying out.

Abrasive works like a desiccant. And after days or weeks of blasting, it can sure take a toll if you don't wear gloves...especially in the dryer winter months.


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Re: Here I Is

Postby Terry W » August 26th, 2018, 8:37 am

I have tried using the nitrile gloves but down here in the humid south the fingers fill up with sweat before I get my hands in the cabinet. :Crazy:
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Re: Here I Is

Postby James Burke » August 26th, 2018, 7:06 pm

Terry W wrote:I have tried using the nitrile gloves but down here in the humid south the fingers fill up with sweat before I get my hands in the cabinet. :Crazy:


Mine are fairly sweaty afterwards. I simply turn them inside out and lay them on the bench until they dry. Then I drop them in a canister of baby powder until next use.

I turn them right side out, hit them with the air hose just a bit so the fingers inflate and they're good to go.


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Re: Here I Is

Postby JESS » August 26th, 2018, 10:29 pm

-------------Sorry, but-------------Yuck!???
I don't use them blasting, but working on my vehicles? Absolutely! I don't get around much, so I've never discussed the sweat thing. Terry, I knew it couldn't be just me. After an hour or so up on top of the motor,(110 degrees), I went under, to reach better. Reached up, and damn near drowned! :DOH:
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